January 21st, 2015   Posted by admin

Olivier Award winner Luke Treadaway originated the lead roles in the National Theatre’s productions of War Horse and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, winning the best actor Olivier for the latter. His film and TV credits include Clapham Junction, Clash of the Titans, Attack the Block and 13 Steps Down. In Fortitude, Luke Treadaway plays scientist Vincent Rattrey.

fortitude-luke-treadaway 

A small and remote research outpost in the Arctic is theoretically one of the safest places on earth, so murder shakes the community to its core. The local sheriff is forced to work alongside a british detective to find the killer before the winter closes in. Starring Stanley Tucci, Michael Gambon, and Christopher Eccleston, Fortitude starts on Sky Atlantic HD on January 29th 2015 at 9pm.

Who is Vincent and how does he fit into the story of Fortitude?

Vincent Rattrey arrives in Fortitude at the beginning of episode one and he’s there to study with Professor Stoddart at the Arctic Research Centre. He’s a clever young scientist who’s interested in the PFAs, the perfluoro-alkoxy compounds, which are giving signs of strange things going on among the apex predators, the polar bears in Fortitude.

He’s previously been studying in England where the apex predator is the badger, so he’s a bit green, everything’s new to him. He comes across some strange customs and he’s also the one that discovers this horrific murder, so things go wrong pretty quickly for him. Vincent is the audience’s way into Fortitude, he’s just stepped off the plane and meeting people for the first time.

How would you describe the series?

It’s about people. I don’t think it’s about polar bears or police or science, but all of that is in this world. It’s about people, how they interact and how the strains of mistrust and people’s hearts can warp the different situations they’re in. You see people being pushed to their limits, and they’re a small group of people, as Dan Anderssen says, clinging onto a rock in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. There’s an extreme sense of isolation where everything is magnified and as this community struggles through the hard times, they try to stay together and remain human.

Did you feel that sense of isolation while you were filming on location?

I’d go off and have a run on my own along a fjord or around a lake, which was beautiful and extremely isolated. But the rest of the time, it was a real bonding experience with the whole cast and crew.

Was there any research you could do to prepare for the role?

I spent some time trying to brush up on my knowledge of perfluoro-alkoxy compounds and what they meant, and I did some research on badgers and polar bears and apex predators in general. I gave myself a crash course in Vincent’s world and then just tried to be open to the fact that, as a character, I’d never been there before. You don’t learn a great deal about Vincent in the first few scripts, so I tried to be open to what that character might develop into as well.

There are a couple of love interests for Vincent along the way, aren’t there?

Yes. Well, love interests as far as they go for Vincent. They’re sort of unseen moments, really, the things that happen between episodes. Sienna’s character, Natalie, is the person Vincent spends most of his time with and they both get pretty involved in the drama and mystery of the island. So Vincent and Natalie develop a bond, but it’s more a meeting of minds.

You’re involved with some of the most gruesome moments of the series. Were you squeamish about any of the props?
I’m a vegetarian and it was funny because it did get to the point where I was asking ‘what are we dissecting today?’. We had an amazing prosthetic animal maker and one day there was a full-sized polar bear on the lab table and we had drills and saws to go into its head with. You’d peel back its skin and then, in one take, you’d carry on into the skull and into the brain that had been perfectly prepared for us to excavate. It was amazing. What I did find weird were the prosthetic humans – they looked so real
and then we’d have to cut them up. I say it was weird, but I did spend most of the time larking around with saws and saying inappropriate things to dead bodies, so I can’t claim it was too traumatic.

How did you deal with the cold?

With thermals, hand warmers and Canada Geese. A lot of the time, I was too hot because with all those thermals on you’d get really warm. I was cold on the days off when I didn’t have Vincent’s coat and I’d be walking around Iceland in a denim jacket, though. Fortitude has attracted such a stellar cast.

What was it like to work with the likes of Michael Gambon, Christopher Eccleston and
Stanley Tucci?

It’s a great team, isn’t it? A script and a story like this is going to attract amazing people. Having a cup of tea in the hotel foyer with Gambon while waiting to get picked up really is the stuff of boyhood dreams. I’m looking forward to there hopefully being a second series where I might be able to cross paths with some of the characters I didn’t interact with so much in this one.

Do you have a preference between film, TV or theatre? And do you approach the mediums differently?

Until now all I’ve really done is theatre and film. I’ve got so much out of that and I’ve loved it. What I’ve found strange about TV is not really knowing what’s coming next, because in film or theatre, you have the whole story before you get going. But I’ve found this so exciting. It’s really fun to work on something for such a long time and watch the story grow. Every night when we sat down to dinner having received the scripts for the next couple of episodes, we’d all be blown away.

Vincent is a scientist and you had to get to grips with some scientific terminology, but how were you at science at school?

Well that’s a question I’ve never been asked before! When I was in year nine, so when I was 14 or so, there were a few of us in my class who were hot into science for some reason.

We were also the bad kids smoking behind the gym, but at the same time we were really good at science, and we had a great teacher, Mr Simpson. Anyway, he picked us to enter a national chemistry competition where we were competing with kids up to the age of 18 and somehow, we got through to the national final. So we came up to London and only went and won the bloody thing against all these hi-tech science public schools, just us five from a little Devon comp. We won a few grand for the school’s chemistry department or something and returned as heroes.

Never mind the Olivier Awards, it’s all about the chemistry. Yes, chemistry club has been my highest achievement for sure! Although I did quit chemistry A-level after the first term because I couldn’t handle it.

Why should Sky Atlantic viewers tune in?

Well I’ve never seen anything like this on TV before, and the trailer alone has literally made me… well, I can’t say what I want to say, but it’s absolutely brilliant. There’s this stunning scenery that is totally connected to the emotion of the story, and the story is gripping and unpredictable. And the performances are phenomenal. It’s so exciting.

Source: IcyMi


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