Source: The Oldie Magazine

admin   April 6th, 2018   Eastenders, James Willmott-Brown, William Boyde



 

As the EastEnders and Game of Thrones star returns to the stage, he explains why he has a soft spot for the epic musical.

Having just finished starring as nice-guy Josh Hemmings in EastEnders the 29 year-old Eddie Eyre is returning to the stage. His career began when he took part in the 24 Hour Plays at the Old Vic and has since starred in Headlong’s The Seagull, the film Mansfield Park and as Detective Trotter in The Mousetrap. Following a stint on Game of Thrones he’s now about to play loveable rogue Horner in Morphic Graffiti’s adaptation of The Country Wifeat Southwark Playhouse.

It’s nice playing a rogue after playing a really nice guy for a year on TV. The role of Horner in The Country Wife is really fun. He’s not a bad guy, he’s charming, but he’s basically pretending he’s a eunuch so that men trust him with their wives. The most dominating thing you can do to a man is have sex with his wife, and Horner is definitely a lothario. But the play isn’t all in your face, there’s a nice romantic story in there too.

We’ve updated the Restoration comedy so it’s set in the 1920s with lots of excess, lavishness, freedom of sex and sexuality. It features people who have survived the first world war and may have had parents, uncles, brothers who have died in it, and so they think: I’m going to live life to the absolute full. It sits really well.

If I could sing I would love to do Les Mis. There are great roles in that show, I love it. But I can’t sing and I’d need a lot of lessons to learn to. My knowledge of musical theatre is abysmal, I enjoy a good musical but I’m not one of those people who goes and watches every show on earth.

 
 

When I was offered an audition for The Mousetrap I thought: ‘What is this show, and do I really want to do it?’ Then when I read the script I realised it’s absolutely fantastic. There’s a reason why it’s been running for 65 years. I played the role of the detective Trotter, which is really good.

On EastEnders, sometimes we would shoot 16 scenes in a day. To compare, when I worked on Game of Thrones, we had a week to shoot a scene. In terms of line learning at speed and working with cameras it’s a really good experience for a young actor. Sometimes you have up to 12 episodes in your head at one time.

I had a great year on the show, but I’m glad to be doing other projects. A year was enough. There’s nothing like theatre. I really love working on screen but there’s nothing like live theatre to watch or be in. But it is more nervewracking because you can’t do another take.

The Country Wife runs at Southwark Playhouse from 4 to 21 April with previews from 28 March.

Source: What’s on Stage

admin   March 27th, 2018   Eddie Eyre



The actor is moving on with a brand new project already

 

The actor, who played Lauren’s love interest Josh Hemmings, is about to tread the boards in a production of restoration comedy The Country Wife – taking on the role of a womanising playboy.

Eddie plays the part of Harry Horner in the play, which explores a world of jazz, gin and scandalous affairs in 1920s London. The show opens at the Southwark Playhouse next month.

Have you enjoyed this chance to move back into theatre now you’ve left EastEnders?

“It’s been great. Like you say, it’s a move back because I’ve always done theatre. I trained at a theatre school, I’ve performed in the West End and worked with some great companies.

“There’s nothing quite like live theatre in terms of an experience. You get a thrill that you don’t get on any other project.”

What drew you to this production in particular?

“It’s got to be the role – Harry Horner. He’s a very naughty boy! Harry is a bit of a Lothario – he’s very sexy, very energetic, loud and in your face. He’s going to be very fun for me to play.”

The play is set in the 1920s, so is it also fun to do a period piece?

“Yeah, definitely – I love costumes. If you’re an actor and you don’t love costumes, there’s something wrong with you!

“The original play was written in 1675 by William Wycherley and got banned for being too naughty and rude for the London stage. There’s a bit of cross-dressing in there and rude language, so back in the day, it was too much. It’s great to bring it into the 1920s and keep that naughtiness.”

Does that humour translate well for a modern audience?

“Yeah, I think it definitely does. At the end of the day, jokes about sex are always funny. They’re funny when you’re a kid and they’re funny when you’re an adult, so it definitely translates. The production that we’re doing is so energetic, loud and colourful, so it’s going to be a really exciting and fun watch.”

Do you feel as though EastEnders has given you a new fanbase who’ll support you in this and other roles?

“Definitely. I’ve already had messages on social media from people saying they’ve bought tickets and are going to come along. I’m really, really grateful that I’ve been able to do EastEnders and build up a fanbase. It’s quite exciting, and I’ve already said to them to give me a shout at the stage door afterwards.”

Do you think being in a high-profile soap makes it easier or harder to get work afterwards?

“It’s 50/50, isn’t it? There’s some people who’ve come from soaps who I really admire. In fact, I went to see Kara Tointon in theatre recently and she’s done fantastically post-EastEnders. I went to see her up in Stratford with the Royal Shakespeare Company, which is the crème de le crème of theatre, so she’s doing really well.

“But then you have other people who don’t really do anything after soaps. I can’t really answer that question yet, but so far, so good!”

Do you enjoy the process of getting out there and auditioning?

“Yeah, it’s definitely a buzz. It’s terrifying when you’re not in work, but it’s part of being an actor. Being an actor is as much being able to deal with the times when you’re not in work. So I do enjoy it but it’s also terrifying!”

How do you look back on your time with EastEnders?

“I had a brilliant time there. It’s such a great cast and crew. I really enjoyed playing Josh. Working on a show like EastEnders, or any other continuing drama, is such a good experience for a young actor who’s wanting camera experience. I had a great time.”

 

Are you sad that Josh didn’t get his happy ending with Lauren?

“As an actor, I’m not that bothered, but as a fan of Josh and Lauren, I’m devastated – how dare she after all that?! (Laughs.) It was a whole year, Josh gave up everything for her and then she left him – awful! It’s left the door open for both characters now, which is interesting. But yeah, devastated!”

What was Jacqueline Jossa (Lauren) like to work with?

“Amazing. She’s lovely, super cool, and very professional. She’d been doing the show for seven years when I joined and she’s such a natural performer. Working with her was so relaxed, so easy and she’s a really nice person.

“I don’t think I could have been matched up with anyone more supportive. You’re thrown in at the deep end when you join EastEnders, but she was there to help me out. I was very happy.”

When you joined, did you always know you were a secret member of the Willmott-Brown family?

“No! The producers kept that a secret even from me. I knew when I joined that I was going to be on the show for six months to a year. I knew I was ‘Josh’ and about his role in the company, but I didn’t know who his dad was. They even used code names on the scripts.

“When Willmott-Brown returned, that was a revelation to me as well as to the audience. But I wouldn’t have played Josh any differently if I had known, so it didn’t really make much difference. Although to know that Josh’s dad was a guy like that was definitely a game-changer.”

Would you have liked to stay around for longer?

“I’m definitely happy with the year that I did. In terms of the experience, I learned a lot and I think I’ve done as much as I wanted to do on the show. I’m not saying that I wouldn’t go back if something was to come up in the future, but I was happy to do a year.”

Have you stayed in touch with anyone from the show?

“I chat to Danny Walters (Keanu) quite a lot. He’s a bit of a gym addict and so am I, so we chat quite a bit. I need to catch up with Jacqueline. I chat to Aaron Sidwell (Steven) as well. He’s off doing Wicked at the moment on tour, but I chatted to him when I left. It was a really nice group of people there at EastEnders.”

Source: Digital Spy

admin   March 21st, 2018   Eastenders, Eddie Eyre, Josh Hemmings



Luke’s death wasn’t only a surprise to viewers – but to actor Adam too.

The mystery of Luke Browning’s disappearance has haunted viewers ever since he was bundled into the back of a white van, never to be seen again.

he mystery of Luke Browning’s disappearance has haunted viewers ever since he was bundled into the back of a white van, never to be seen again.

However, EastEnders fans finally got their answer last week as Phil Mitchell revealed that Luke had been killed by gangster Aidan Maguire’s goons.

But, even more surprisingly, actor Adam Astill had no idea that his character had been killed off until he saw the scenes on screen.

Speaking to OK! Online , he said: “If I’m honest I’ve only just caught up on Friday’s episode so I’ve only just found out. My reaction? Ouch!”

During Friday’s episode, Phil confronted Aidan in the Queen Vic as he revealed that the teeth the gangster had given him in the box belonged to Luke.

Aidan had said that Phil had told him to “do him”.

But Phil replied: “No, I told you to scare Luke off, not to kill him.”

Soap star Adam quipped that he had “wondered if Luke died before or after they removed his teeth”.

He added: “I found out with the rest of the viewers. I only knew what was in the script, that Luke got bundled into the van and that’s the last we saw of him.”

Talking about the flurried reaction to finding out where Luke had gone, he said: “I sort of assumed [viewers would] just think he got what he deserved but it’e s nice to hear he hasn’t just been forgotten about, even though he did turn out to be horrible, as I really enjoyed playing him.”

Source: Daily Mirror

admin   March 14th, 2018   Adam Astill, Eastenders, Luke Browning



Lisa Faulkner, 44, lives with her partner, MasterChef judge John Torode, in London. She has an adopted daughter, Billie, nine, and John has four children from previous relationships.

 

One of the best things about going into a relationship slightly later in life is that it makes you appreciate what you have.It’s easy to be quite foolish when you’re young, but now that I’ve found John, I think, “I’m not going to let this go, I’m going to look after this.” We have date nights every week – we’ll go for dinner or to the cinema – and we write little notes for each other when one of us goes away. John actually left for work this morning at 5am, and I found one next to the teabags. It was lovely.

Lisa Faulkner, 44, lives with her partner, MasterChef judge John Torode, in London. She has an adopted daughter, Billie, nine, and John has four children from previous relationships.

One of the best things about going into a relationship slightly later in life is that it makes you appreciate what you have. It’s easy to be quite foolish when you’re young, but now that I’ve found John, I think, “I’m not going to let this go, I’m going to look after this.” We have date nights every week – we’ll go for dinner or to the cinema – and we write little notes for each other when one of us goes away. John actually left for work this morning at 5am, and I found one next to the teabags. It was lovely.

I love the fact that between us, John and I have this wonderful blended family. I don’t see myself as a mother figure to his kids though, I’m more of a friend and a confidante. When all the children are in the house with us, it’s the best feeling. My favourite time is when it’s breakfast and you’ve got one person boiling an egg, another making pancakes and someone else putting sausages in the oven – and all the jars of jam and chocolate spread are out on the table. It’s what I call “happy chaos” – I love it.

Counselling has seen me through some difficult times – not only when I lost my mum to throat cancer when I was 16, but through an ectopic pregnancy and several failed rounds of IVF. It’s funny though, because there’s this assumption a counsellor gives you the answers to your problems, but actually, you just have to talk, and some days you come out feeling great and other days you come out feeling rubbish. It’s not easy, but there is light at the end of the tunnel.

For a long time, I measured success on being offered another job. The other day I looked around me when I was at home and the kids were jumping on and off the bed, and there was mess everywhere and I thought, “Everyone’s happy” – and I felt like I’d done something right. Now I see success as appreciating the small things because in fact, they’re the big things.

When my mum was very ill, she wrote me a letter in which she said, “Keep your shoulders back and don’t follow the crowd.”That’s become more important to me the older I’ve got. It’s easy to say, “I’m this age now and I’m stuck in this rut and that’s fine” – but actually, sometimes you have to jump. For years my life was defined by being an actress, then I did MasterChef and my heart would beat with an excitement I hadn’t really felt before. If I hadn’t closed my eyes and thrown myself into it, I wouldn’t be doing the thing I love today. We’ve all got it in us to do that.

My new book, From Mother to Mother, has been inspired by the women in my life. It started when I asked all my family and friends who are mothers for their favourite recipes that have been passed down the generations – and they let me play around with them. You’ll find everything from my cousin’s butternut squash Bolognese to Auntie Lil’s chicken soup, each with a twist. And maybe I’m biased, but they taste pretty good!

Lisa’s book, From Mother to Mother (Simon & Schuster), is out 9 March.

Source: womanandhome.com

admin   February 3rd, 2018   Lisa Faulkner



Almost thirty years after her rape ordeal, the Walford favourite will have a terrifying showdown with her attacker, who refuses to believe he did anything wrong…

Kathy Beale’s worst nightmare is about to come true. The EastEnders favourite will soon be confronted by her rapist James Willmott Brown, who has recently returned to Walford and is secretly plotting to take over the square.

Actress Gillian Taylforth talks about the terrifying showdown, and shares her memories of filming Kathy’s rape storyline in the 1980s…

Can you describe the moment when Kathy comes face to face with Willmott Brown again?
“It’s in the café. The lights are all off because Kathy is closing up, and it’s really eerie. Willmott Brown feels he was harddone by because he got three years in prison for the rape. He thinks that he and Kathy were having an affair and that they were going to go off into the sunset together. He can’t understand why Kathy told all these ‘lies’ and he wants to clear the air. He’s like: ‘I’ve served my time, but what a shame I had to go through all that.’ It’s brilliantly written and very clever.”

Is Willmott Brown deceiving himself or does he genuinely believe that he did nothing wrong?
He genuinely believes that he and Kathy were having an affair. That’s what he told his family – that they were an item and that Kathy was going to leave her husband Pete for him. He’s so deluded.”

Is he more unpredictable because he’s so deluded?
“Oh yes, and Kathy actually says to him, ‘You’re deluded; you’re out of your head!’ So you do wonder what he’s going to do next. This man is on his own wavelength.”

Is Kathy scared of him?
“In the beginning, she’s very frightened – this man has suddenly come back into her life. She does stand up to him and say: ‘This is what happened.’ But she can’t stand the fact that he’s around, and might be in the Square for a while. She is frightened because she thinks he could turn up anywhere she goes.”

Kathy doesn’t tell Ian straight away about Willmott Brown’s visit – why not?
“She doesn’t want anyone to know, because it’s something she wants to forget about. But he finds her one day. She hears a noise and she jumps and hides on the floor, and Ian says: ‘Mum, you’re shaking!’ So she has to tell him, and then Ian tells Phil. Kathy has told Ian that she doesn’t want Phil knowing, but but he says ‘I had to.’ And then in the end, Kathy thinks ‘Well at least Phil’s going to do something, because I just want something done about it.’”

Does Kathy have an idea of what Phil might do?
“I think she’s pretty damn sure what Phil might do, yeah! Which is what Phil normally does!”

How did you feel when you this storyline was pitched to you?
“I didn’t know anything about it! I came into work one day and saw Will (William Boyde, who plays Willmott-Brown) sitting there. He said, ‘Do you know what’s happening?’ And I said, ‘no’. So it was a lovely shock. Will’s great to work with. It was so nice to see him again after all these years.”

Had you seen William Boyde since he was last in the show, in 1992?
No, not at all. He’s been down in Dorset, working on boats, and running his company. He hasn’t been doing much, TV-wise, but he does a lot of voice-overs. It was so lovely to see him again, and he’s a lovely actor. And he just got straight back into it again. You wouldn’t have thought that he’d been out of it for so long. I was amazed. And that lovely voice as well. I swoon!”

Were you daunted or excited about revisiting Kathy’s rape storyline?
“I was excited about it. At the time of the original storyline, I remember going through those scenes at home and being quite upset, and I got very depressed by it. But obviously Will and I did it, and we got through it. To relive it again – I did wonder what they were going to do. But it was wonderfully written and it’s a great episode when Kathy and Willmott-Brown come face to face again. There are only about nine or ten scenes in the episode, and seven or eight of them are me and Will. There’s one particular scene that was 15 pages long and it’s me talking for about nine or 10 of them. But it was great to do, and Will was fantastic; a great support.”

What are your memories of the rape storyline, and what was it like being in the eye of the media storm?

“Weirdly enough, I said to Will when he first came back, ‘How are you feeling?’ and he went ‘I’m a bit nervous.’ I think when we did the rape storyline, that was the first big rape storyline that had gone on, and when it went out, everyone was talking about it. I remember my cousin phoning me up and saying she’d had a big row with her husband because he was saying ‘Why did Kathy go upstairs with Willmott Brown?’ and she was going ‘You’re allowed to go upstairs and have a drink with someone if you want; it doesn’t mean you want to be raped!’ And poor Will had these people shouting at him, ‘Leave Kathy alone!’ He said, ‘I don’t want all that again!’ But I said that it’s not like how it was then. Things have changed, there’s so many channels on, and there have been other rape storylines on TV. I was like ‘It’s quietened down a bit Will, it won’t be like it was before.’ But looking back at those times, I couldn’t believe the enormity of it all. It was amazing and quite scary when that went out, the attitude of everybody and the storm it created.”

Are you proud that you were part of raising the discussion about rape back then?
“Oh yes, definitely. It’s always nice to know that you’re involved in something like that, and that was a big storyline for me at the time. I remember getting letters from people, and I’m not an agony aunt and I don’t feel right to answer people’s letters, but I did get quite a few from people saying ‘This has happened to me, I don’t know whether to tell my boyfriend or not, what should I do?’ So I went to the researchers here, and we took hold of it that way. But it was a storyline that got it out there, and  was proud to be a part of that.”

Source: What’s On TV

admin   November 2nd, 2017   Eastenders, James Willmott-Brown, William Boyde



admin   October 29th, 2017   Eastenders, James Willmott-Brown



Some lovely words about Will from Assistant Editor of the Daily Express Jennifer Selway.

admin   October 7th, 2017   James Willmott-Brown, William Boyde


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